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17 9 / 2014

(Source: aidn, via norwegian-would)

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17 9 / 2014

gestured:

there’s this thing u should try it’s called stop ignoring me

(via norwegian-would)

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17 9 / 2014

bace-jeleren:

catsandcunts:

YOUR BODY IS BEAUTIFUL IF:

  • you have a body
  • that’s it
  • you’re beautiful
  • you win
  • congratulations 

You have potentially offended hundreds if not thousands of ghosts.

(Source: rl-y, via norwegian-would)

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17 9 / 2014

ace-enjolras:

I don’t think writers realize that “strong female character” means “well written female character” and not “female character who punches stuff and shoots stuff”

(via norwegian-would)

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17 9 / 2014

spicy-vagina-tacos:

maybe-theres-wifi:

spicy-vagina-tacos:

Guess who just bought a plane ticket to go visit her amazing girlfriend in a month ❤️☺️

but aren’t you a girl

This just in: queer people exist

(via norwegian-would)

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17 9 / 2014

allthecanadianpolitics:

Tory staffer fired after supporting inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women

A Manitoba Conservative staffer who expressed support for a missing women’s inquiry was fired for voicing a viewpoint that veered from the party line on the issue. 
Spencer Fernando, a member of the Progressive Conservative caucus in Manitoba, had recently attended a vigil for 15-year-old Aboriginal girl Tina Fontaine, whose body was found wrapped in a bag and dumped in the Red River in Winnipeg in August. Her death sparked outcry and renewed calls for an inquiry into the nation’s 1,181 missing or murdered Aboriginal women. 
"I heard a lot of people discussing the need for an inquiry. You could feel the emotion in their voices…so I felt compelled to share my own thoughts," he told the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network. 
Fernando said he wasn’t necessarily fired by the Conservatives for his blog post, but that the party was not happy about him expressing his views about the matter. 
"The concern was, that as a member of the caucus staff, I should not be taking policy positions publicly." 
Statistics show that Aboriginal women are disproportionately affected by violent crime, despite the fact that Aboriginal people are only 4.3 per cent of the national population. In Saskatchewan, 55 per cent of the female murder victims from 1980-2012 were Aboriginal (see RCMP report for further statistics). In Ferndando’s home province of Manitoba, Aborignal women comprised 49 per cent of female murder victims, despite comprising just 16.7 per cent of the total Manitoban population.
Aboriginal women are not only more likely to be killed, but also 3.5 times more likely to experience violence than non-Aboriginal women in Canada. 
Fernando’s blog post said an inquiry would not only bring causes of violence against Aboriginal women to light, but show that government viewed Indigenous women as “worthy of national attention”. 
Excerpts from his blog: 

The fact is that this is an ongoing problem. So it’s not enough to investigate deaths after they happen. We need to find a way to prevent the deaths from happening, and an inquiry could help achieve that goal.
A public inquiry would accomplish something else of importance as well. It would send a clear message that the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women is seen as worthy of national attention.
Injustice and despair thrives in the shadows. An inquiry could bring these things into the light. An inquiry would send a message that, while we can’t change our past, we are willing to learn from it.
Yes, an inquiry could bring up some dark truths. Yet, by facing those truths with clear eyes and open hearts, we can learn, grow, and respond together, as one nation.
I believe that Canada will not achieve our full potential until all who live within our borders feel respected and valued, and feel like an equal part of our Canadian family.
A public inquiry would be an important step along the road to healing, and greater security for all. That is why I support a public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women.


Fernando is not the only Conservative-aligned voice calling for more action on missing Aboriginal women in Canada. Although not part of the party, Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall — described as the Conservative movement’s ‘best communicator’ — has also expressed his support for an inquiry into missing and murdered women. See more here. 

allthecanadianpolitics:

Tory staffer fired after supporting inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women

A Manitoba Conservative staffer who expressed support for a missing women’s inquiry was fired for voicing a viewpoint that veered from the party line on the issue. 

Spencer Fernando, a member of the Progressive Conservative caucus in Manitoba, had recently attended a vigil for 15-year-old Aboriginal girl Tina Fontaine, whose body was found wrapped in a bag and dumped in the Red River in Winnipeg in August. Her death sparked outcry and renewed calls for an inquiry into the nation’s 1,181 missing or murdered Aboriginal women. 

"I heard a lot of people discussing the need for an inquiry. You could feel the emotion in their voices…so I felt compelled to share my own thoughts," he told the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network. 

Fernando said he wasn’t necessarily fired by the Conservatives for his blog post, but that the party was not happy about him expressing his views about the matter. 

"The concern was, that as a member of the caucus staff, I should not be taking policy positions publicly." 

Statistics show that Aboriginal women are disproportionately affected by violent crime, despite the fact that Aboriginal people are only 4.3 per cent of the national population. In Saskatchewan, 55 per cent of the female murder victims from 1980-2012 were Aboriginal (see RCMP report for further statistics). In Ferndando’s home province of Manitoba, Aborignal women comprised 49 per cent of female murder victims, despite comprising just 16.7 per cent of the total Manitoban population.

Aboriginal women are not only more likely to be killed, but also 3.5 times more likely to experience violence than non-Aboriginal women in Canada. 

Fernando’s blog post said an inquiry would not only bring causes of violence against Aboriginal women to light, but show that government viewed Indigenous women as “worthy of national attention”. 

Excerpts from his blog: 

The fact is that this is an ongoing problem. So it’s not enough to investigate deaths after they happen. We need to find a way to prevent the deaths from happening, and an inquiry could help achieve that goal.

A public inquiry would accomplish something else of importance as well. It would send a clear message that the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women is seen as worthy of national attention.

Injustice and despair thrives in the shadows. An inquiry could bring these things into the light. An inquiry would send a message that, while we can’t change our past, we are willing to learn from it.

Yes, an inquiry could bring up some dark truths. Yet, by facing those truths with clear eyes and open hearts, we can learn, grow, and respond together, as one nation.

I believe that Canada will not achieve our full potential until all who live within our borders feel respected and valued, and feel like an equal part of our Canadian family.

A public inquiry would be an important step along the road to healing, and greater security for all. That is why I support a public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women.


Fernando is not the only Conservative-aligned voice calling for more action on missing Aboriginal women in Canada. Although not part of the party, Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall — described as the Conservative movement’s ‘best communicator’ — has also expressed his support for an inquiry into missing and murdered women. 

See more here. 

(via postpositivism)

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16 9 / 2014

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16 9 / 2014

tomfleton:

i should just put a link to my about tag on my college applications 

(via postpositivism)

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16 9 / 2014

teachytv:

10 years ago today, Ebony Dark’ness Dementia Raven Way went back in time to sedouce Volxemort and protect all of us from his evil plans

reblog this post to honor Enoby’s brave sacrifice, ignore if you’re a prep or a poser

(via postpositivism)

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16 9 / 2014

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16 9 / 2014

omq-am0ur said: GOOD VIBES CHALLENGE!! When you get this message, you have to say 5 nice things about yourself, and then pass it along to 10 of your favorite followers! ^v^ have fun!

  1. im determined
  2. im fun to be around (i think? hopefully)
  3. i can make people smile / be happy / yay fun times
  4. im pretty smart if i believe in myself
  5. i have awesome friends. is that a nice thing about myself? if i have awesome friends that must mean im awesome right? idk. 

sorry this was so late. >.< 

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16 9 / 2014

koalatea:

me at forever 21

  • “wow this would be great if it weren’t covered in crosses and studs”
  • “was the galaxy print necessary”
  • “why is this so cheap”
  • “why is this so expensive”
  • “why is everything so ugly”
  • “why are 90% of my clothes from here”
  • “i hate everything here”
  • “im gonna buy everything”

(Source: koalatea, via postpositivism)

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16 9 / 2014

"Ben Barres is a biologist at Stanford who lived and worked as Barbara Barres until he was in his forties. For most of his career, he experienced bias, but didn’t give much weight to it—seeing incidents as discrete events. (When he solved a tough math problem, for example, a professor said, “You must have had your boyfriend solve it.”) When he became Ben, however, he immediately noticed a difference in his everyday experience: “People who don’t know I am transgendered [sic] treat me with much more respect,” he says. He was more carefully listened to and his authority less frequently questioned. He stopped being interrupted in meetings. At one conference, another scientist said, “Ben gave a great seminar today—but then his work is so much better than his sister’s.” (The scientist didn’t know Ben and Barbara were the same person.) “This is why women are not breaking into academic jobs at any appreciable rate,” he wrote in response to Larry Summers’s famous gaffe implying women were less innately capable at the hard sciences. “Not childcare. Not family responsibilities,” he says. “I have had the thought a million times: I am taken more seriously.”"

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16 9 / 2014

softmikus:

yeah good grades are cool and all but have you ever had a good night sleep

(Source: sylvehun, via draqonstho)

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16 9 / 2014

What people think recovery looks like vs. what it really looks like

(Source: dangergays, via after-crisis)